COVID-19 Updates from SHC

The COVID-19 updates on this page about Student Health Services. For full UCSC Campus COVID-19 updates, see https://recovery.ucsc.edu/

SHC IS OPEN and committed to protecting your health! See our Current Services list to learn about new telehealth services and how to use UC SHIP while off-campus.

See all of SHC's COVID-19 Information including instructions on testing and symptom checks for on-campus students, staff, and faculty.

March 29, 2021

Students, have you been wondering when it will be your turn to get a COVID-19 vaccine? California residents age 16 and over will be eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine on April 15 (and if you are a student age 50 or older, your eligibility starts on April 1).

Because of the rapid change in vaccine availability and distribution, the UCSC Student Health Center is not currently planning more first-dose vaccine clinics. However, this may change as vaccine availability expands. In the meantime, we encourage students, staff, and faculty to check the list of Alternative Vaccine Sites to schedule a vaccine when you become eligible in April. Remember,the COVID-19 vaccine is free!

 

March 23, 2021

First Dose Vaccine Clinics Have Ended: Because of the rapid change in vaccine availability and distribution, we are not currently planning more first-dose vaccine clinics. However, this may change as vaccine availability expands. See alternative vaccine sites or visit the County of Santa Cruz Health Services Agency vaccine website.

Spring Break Closure Notice: The Student Health Center and asymptomatic testing kiosks are operating with limited hours during Spring Break. Get more information about testing during Spring Break.

  

March 15, 2021

Staying on campus for spring break? It’s the safest place to be!

If you must travel during spring break, keep these points in mind:

  • If you leave campus, please do not plan to return to campus until the start of spring quarter at which time you will need to sequester in your campus residence for 10 days. Sequestering means minimizing in-person interactions, whether in the residence halls, dining facilities, classrooms, or other campus locations. Students may leave their residences only to participate in essential activities (e.g., to purchase food, pick up mail, participate in low-risk outdoor recreational activities, employment, or obtain health care services). 
  • While away from campus, rigorously follow all COVID-19-related mitigation strategies (wear a face covering, adhere to physical distancing guidelines, and wash hands frequently).
  • If you are exposed to COVID-19 or begin to experience symptoms while away from campus, do not return to campus until your medical provider issues a clearance for you.

With travel restricted because of COVID-19, UC Santa Cruz aims to keep on-campus students entertained with a spring break 'staycation' featuring themed dining nights, scavenger hunts, kayak tours, and more during the week of March 20–27. Check out all the fun things to do during your staycation!

If you will be on campus during spring break:

  • Continue to complete your twice weekly asymptomatic tests, which will be available at the Merrill Cultural Center by appointment.
  • If you feel ill with COVID-19 symptoms, first follow the county's isolation guidelines. Then contact SHS at 831-459-2591 for medical advice and to obtain an appointment for testing.
  • For non-urgent COVID-19 questions, contact us through Health e-Messenger. Log in and go to Messages<New Messages<COVID-19 question.

If you’re moving into Student Housing: Welcome back! Learn about COVID-19 requirements and precautions if you’re moving back into Student Housing.

 

February 23, 2021

In this update, we’ve answered common questions and shared  important news from the CDC. Plus, if you’re a student who is dealing with eating disorders, we can help!

Your COVID-19 Questions Answered

If I've tested positive for COVID-19 and have fully recovered, do I need to keep doing the asymptomatic tests?

If you tested positive for COVID-19 and have fully recovered, you don't need to participate in asymptomatic testing for three months following your positive COVID-19 test. However if you develop COVID-19 symptoms, contact your healthcare provider and do not come to campus.

If I've tested positive for COVID-19 and have recovered, do I need to keep doing the daily screening surveys?

Yes, continue to complete the daily screening surveys for every day that you're coming to campus. If you develop COVID-19 symptoms, contact your healthcare provider and do not come to campus.

Can I stop wearing masks and socially distancing if I’ve already had COVID-19 or if I’ve been vaccinated?

No, please keep wearing masks and socially distancing until scientists have learned whether COVID-19 can be spread by vaccinated people or those who have already had COVID-19. Even when vaccinated, you can still have the virus in your nose or mouth. It won't make you sick but you can spread to others if you cough, sneeze, laugh, sing, etc.

Remember to follow the Slug Strong actions to promote a healthy campus:

  • Complete your daily symptom check, if you are accessing a campus site
  • Wear a face covering 
  • Abide by posted physical distancing guidelines  
  • Participate in the asymptomatic testing program that has been made available for members of our campus community. 
  • Do not come to work or on site if you are feeling ill
  • Regularly wash your hands

Is the vaccine safe?

Yes, it is. See our Vaccine FAQs for information about safety. Our nurses are also happy to answer your questions during your appointment, or you can contact your primary care provider with questions. 

How much will the vaccine cost me?

The vaccine is free and doesn't depend on insurance.

If I test positive for COVID-19, how will you ensure my privacy? 

We take privacy and data protection seriously. All Student Health Services staff trained annually in HIPAA privacy practices, and all our technology is HIPAA-compliant. If you test positive, we only share your information if it poses a risk to a campus.

How do I know if I need to quarantine after being near a person with COVID-19?

You need to quarantine if you have been in close contact with a person with COVID-19. Here is how the CDC defines a “close contact.

  • You were within six feet of someone who has COVID-19 for a total of 15 minutes or more
  • You provided care at home to someone who is sick with COVID-19
  • You had direct physical contact with the person (hugged or kissed them)
  • You shared eating or drinking utensils
  • They sneezed, coughed, or somehow got respiratory droplets on you
  • Be sure to read below about the new guidance for exposure after vaccination.

Can I get or give COVID-19 through a pet? 

While possible, it is very unlikely. See the CDC’s guidance on what to do if you have pets.

 Health News You Should Know

  • The CDC has new info about how to get the best mask fit with the most protection
  • If you were exposed to a COVID-19 positive person but you’ve been vaccinated, the CDC says you are not required to quarantine if you meet all of the following criteria:
    • Are fully vaccinated (i.e., ≥2 weeks following receipt of the second dose in a 2-dose series, or ≥2 weeks following receipt of one dose of a single-dose vaccine)
    • Are within 3 months following receipt of the last dose in the series
    • Have remained asymptomatic since the current COVID-19 exposure
    • You must still wear your mask to avoid spreading COVID-19 to others. Even when vaccinated, you can still have the virus in your nose or mouth. It won't make you sick but you can spread to others if you cough, sneeze, laugh, sing, etc.
  • Our nation is seeing a rise in eating disorders among young people due to COVID-19. Many students find that their exercise and eating routines have been disrupted. COVID-related stress, loneliness, and isolation can lead to an unhealthy approach to food. If you want help getting your eating plan back on track, contact Student Health Services for an appointment with one of our providers. Our doctors, nurses, nutritionist, and health outreach professionals have experience with eating disorders among students.